1. Officials unable to contact animal-carrying spaceship

    spaceexp:

    http://cdn1.img22.ria.ru/images/93841/06/938410652.jpgThe Russian Foton M4 space capsule carrying a package of biological and materials research specimens, including geckos and plant seeds, has stopped responding to commands from Earth, the Russian space agency announced Thursday (July 24). Researchers planned to monitor the effects of microgravity on the adult geckos, including their sexual behavior and embryonic development

    Read More

     
  2. [Nichelle Nichols’] record of accomplishment speaks for itself: NASA originally had 1500 applicants from women and minorities on file. Women in Motion helped spur that number to exceed 8000 in six months. Nichols received the American Society of Aerospace Education’s Friend of the Year award for ‘outstanding contributions to the promotion of aviation and space.
    —  from a November 1985 article in Starlog about Nichelle Nichols’ work with NASA’s Women in Motion program. (via trekkiefeminist)
     
  3. 10:18 21st Jul 2014

    notes: 767

    reblogged from: einbear

    tags: space explorationApollo 111969

    crookedindifference:

    Read the Apollo 11 Flight Plan in Its 353-Page Entirety

    Exactly 45 years ago today, after months of preparation, Apollo 11 embarked on its now-legendary mission to the moon. But what exactly does it take to send three men into the great, vacuous unknown? See for yourself.

    This 353-page document is the entire Apollo 11 flight plan in all its scientific glory. And if it gets a little confusing it’s because this is one of those rare cases where, yes, it actually is rocket science.

    Thankfully, the National Archives does provide a small amount of decoding of the highly technical literature. This acronym key should be of some help:

    • CSM = Command Service Module
    • CMP = Command Module Pilot (Mike Collins)
    • LM = Lunar Module
    • CDR = Commander of the Mission (Neil Armstrong)
    • LMP = Lunar Module Pilot (Buzz Aldrin)
    • MCC-H = Mission Control Center-Houston.
    • LLM = Lunar Landing Mision
    • S/C = Spacecraft

    And as an added bonus, NASA has also kindly made available the entire Apollo 11 onboard voice transcription. Yep—you get to be privy to every last word uttered between our three space heroes as they were making history happen.

     
  4. 09:28 8th Jul 2014

    notes: 209

    reblogged from: m1k3y

    tags: Venusspace exploration1982Russia

    image: download

    m1k3y:

Venusian Surface and Sky, from Venera 13 (1982)
Credits: Soviet Space Agency - Credits for the additional process. and color.: Dr Don P. Mitchell and Dr Paolo C. Fienga/Lunar Explorer Italia/IPF

The Venera 13 lander survived for 127 minutes (the planned design life was 32 minutes) in an environment with a temperature of 457 °C (855 °F) and a pressure of 89 Earth atmospheres (9.0 MPa). The descent vehicle transmitted data to the bus, which acted as a data relay as it flew by Venus. (Wikipedia)

    m1k3y:

    Venusian Surface and Sky, from Venera 13 (1982)

    Credits: Soviet Space Agency - Credits for the additional process. and color.: Dr Don P. Mitchell and Dr Paolo C. Fienga/Lunar Explorer Italia/IPF

    The Venera 13 lander survived for 127 minutes (the planned design life was 32 minutes) in an environment with a temperature of 457 °C (855 °F) and a pressure of 89 Earth atmospheres (9.0 MPa). The descent vehicle transmitted data to the bus, which acted as a data relay as it flew by Venus. (Wikipedia)

     
  5. pdxtales:

Front page of The Oregonian, September 12th 1985. Top story: Pete Rose breaking Ty Cobb’s record for career hits, just beating out humanity’s first visit to a comet.
Incidentally the space probe that visited this comet is finally returning to Earth’s neighborhood this year. A team of volunteers is busy reviving it, and if all goes well it may be sent off for further adventures.

    pdxtales:

    Front page of The Oregonian, September 12th 1985. Top story: Pete Rose breaking Ty Cobb’s record for career hits, just beating out humanity’s first visit to a comet.

    Incidentally the space probe that visited this comet is finally returning to Earth’s neighborhood this year. A team of volunteers is busy reviving it, and if all goes well it may be sent off for further adventures.

     
  6. image: download

    colchrishadfield:

Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

    colchrishadfield:

    Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

     
  7. moltovomito:

Sunset on Mars

    moltovomito:

    Sunset on Mars

     
  8. selfmetonomy:

    The purpose of these tests is to help the SpaceX engineers devise a way of eventually bringing full-size, fully-loaded launch vehicles back to the launch pad. As it stands, most space launch vehicles simply fall into the ocean, never to be used again. SpaceX’s reusable launch system will eventually see both the first and second stages of the Falcon 9 rocket lift off into space… and then gently fly back and land on the launch pad. (If you’re interested in how a giant tube with propulsion at only one end does this, read our original Grasshopper story.)

    “`

    OMG you guys!  It’s starting!  Think about what the development of this tech will mean for space travel!  ASJHAKSFHHKFLAKSJDLSA

    This is so exciting!  

     
  9. 09:52 23rd May 2014

    notes: 381

    reblogged from: electricspacekoolaid

    tags: space exploration

    image: download

    electricspacekoolaid:

Space Sailing: How Interstellar Light Propelled Sailing Works
     
  10. Long before there was western science, our ancestors were doing remarkable things in observing the world around us and making structures that captured the solar cycle. Chaco canyon is a great example of that.

    They were very talented observers. Long before western science, western mathematics, came along, they were building these remarkably detailed structures. Our ancestors were doing it. Native people have been very talented engineers and scientists for millennia. They did it for survival. You have to be very observant to the world around you in order to survive.

    On another side of that, talking about the southwest, about my tribe’s [mounds]—looking at the mounds structures, they’re oriented to the cardinal directions. These huge mounds, built by hand, align with the cardinal directions. How did they do that, measure things out and build it? It took a lot of expertise to do that. So those were remarkable engineers thousands of years ago. That’s directly related. So that’s near and dear to my heart.

    I like to solve problems. I like to see how stuff works. I like challenge. My ancestors were able to rise to challenges that came their way. I’d like to say I’m doing the same thing.

    — Astronaut John B. Herrington, first American Indian (Chickasaw) in space, when asked in this interview ”What can Indigenous perspectives bring to space exploration?” (via karonhiake)