1. image: download

     
  2. 11:05 13th Sep 2014

    notes: 1465

    reblogged from: barkpark

    tags: space explorationdogRussia

    image: download

    scanzen:

The early years of the soviet space program on matchbox 8/16: Belka and Strelka. Soviet matchbox cover, c1970.

    scanzen:

    The early years of the soviet space program on matchbox 8/16: Belka and Strelka. Soviet matchbox cover, c1970.

     
  3. image: download

    rocketdigital:

It is the first global geological map of Mars since the Viking orbiter’s effort in 1987 – which you can stroll through on Google Earth. It reveals that much of the Martian surface is older than previously thought, and confirms the planet was geologically active until recently.
The map will help pinpoint interesting landing spots for upcoming missions like the European Space Agency’s ExoMars, due to launch in 2018, and NASA’s InSight, due to launch in 2016 – not to mention ambitious plans to put a reality-TV show on Mars.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25907-epic-map-reveals-marss-geography-in-unrivalled-detail.html

    rocketdigital:

    It is the first global geological map of Mars since the Viking orbiter’s effort in 1987 – which you can stroll through on Google Earth. It reveals that much of the Martian surface is older than previously thought, and confirms the planet was geologically active until recently.

    The map will help pinpoint interesting landing spots for upcoming missions like the European Space Agency’s ExoMars, due to launch in 2018, and NASA’s InSight, due to launch in 2016 – not to mention ambitious plans to put a reality-TV show on Mars.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25907-epic-map-reveals-marss-geography-in-unrivalled-detail.html

     
  4. A Spacecraft for All: 

    • Launched in 1978 and originally tasked with studying the outer reaches of the Earth’s magnetosphere, the International Sun/Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3) probe was given a second mission in the 1980s of chasing comets before being shut down in 1997.
    • It was determined to be possible to reactivate the spacecraft in 2014, when it again made a close approach to Earth, and scientists discussed reusing the probe to observe more comets. However, NASA was no longer interested in recovering the spacecraft because of the limitations of its present budgets.
    •  A group of space enthusiasts began to talk. Retired and active aerospace engineers began to exchange ideas with avid HAM radio operators around the world.  Finally, one group took charge. They made a agreement with NASA to have the rights to use ISEE-3 for the benefit of citizen science and obtained the old documentation.  
    • In May 2014, the ISEE-3 Reboot Project raised more than $150,000 with crowdfunding. Some original NASA engineers and various experts offered their help. The group gathered old equipment in their headquarters, an abandoned McDonald’s (they call it McMoons). After a lot of work and trial and error, two-way communication was achieved and ISEE-3 truly became ISEE-3 Reboot. 
    • The ultimate goal was to command the spacecraft to fire its rocket engines to change its trajectory and become captured by the Earth’s gravitational field.  On July 2, the reboot project fired the thrusters for the first time since 1987. They spun up the spacecraft to its nominal roll rate, in preparation for the upcoming trajectory correction maneuver in mid-July. On July 8, a longer sequence of thrusters firings failed, apparently due to a loss of the nitrogen gas used to pressurize the fuel tanks
    • On July 24, the ISEE-3 Reboot Team announced that all attempts to change orbit using the ISEE-3 propulsion system had failed. Instead, the team said, the ISEE-3 Interplanetary Citizen Science Mission would gather data as the spacecraft flies by the Moon on August 10 and enters a heliocentric orbit similar to Earth’s. 
    • Google Creative Labs documented the adventure and created the compendium which was delivered to the public domain last week, A Spacecraft for All

    I tried to summarize the main events of this great technical adventure. The details are interesting. I invite you to visit the google site and to read more: 

    my sources: gizmag (good article) and wikipedia

    The ISEE-3 Reboot blog: spacecollege.org/isee3/

     

     
  5. 08:56 7th Aug 2014

    notes: 64

    reblogged from: flyaros

    tags: Rosettaspace explorationcomet

    flyaros:

    How to orbit a comet from ESA channel

     
  6. wellreadblackandgreen:

Comet 67P details - OSIRIS by europeanspaceagency on Flickr.
"After 10 years and a journey of four billion miles, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived at its destination on Wednesday for the first extended, close examination of a comet. “A six-minute thruster firing beginning at 5 a.m. Eastern time, the last in a series of 10 over the past few months, slowed Rosetta to the pace of a person walking, about two miles per hour relative to the speed of its target, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenk. “Over the coming months, Rosetta and its comet, called C-G for short, will plunge together toward the sun. In November, a small 220-pound lander is to leave the spacecraft, set down on the comet and harpoon itself to the surface. “That will be the first time a spacecraft has gently landed on a comet. “It’s really going to get down and scratch the surface to get the most pristine material that we can from the surface of the comet,” said Matthew Taylor, the mission’s project scientist. “The $1.7 billion Rosetta mission will provide a much longer, much closer look at one comet. Instead of taking a brief snapshot, Rosetta will observe as the comet goes from a quiescent ball of ice and rock to an active comet spewing out dust and gas and then make before-and-after comparisons. “We’ll observe how this occurs, how this activity is onset, how it fluctuates, really how a comet works over a long time period,” Dr. Taylor said. “That’s really the difference between this and anything that’s been done before.” “Launched in March 2004, it followed a circuitous route through the solar system, using flybys of the Earth and Mars to fling itself into the same orbital path as Comet C-G. In January, it successfully emerged from a hibernation of two and a half years and began its final approach.”

The first manmade spacecraft to orbit a comet. Congratulations ESA! 

    wellreadblackandgreen:

    Comet 67P details - OSIRIS by europeanspaceagency on Flickr.

    "After 10 years and a journey of four billion miles, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived at its destination on Wednesday for the first extended, close examination of a comet.

    “A six-minute thruster firing beginning at 5 a.m. Eastern time, the last in a series of 10 over the past few months, slowed Rosetta to the pace of a person walking, about two miles per hour relative to the speed of its target, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenk.

    “Over the coming months, Rosetta and its comet, called C-G for short, will plunge together toward the sun. In November, a small 220-pound lander is to leave the spacecraft, set down on the comet and harpoon itself to the surface.

    “That will be the first time a spacecraft has gently landed on a comet. “It’s really going to get down and scratch the surface to get the most pristine material that we can from the surface of the comet,” said Matthew Taylor, the mission’s project scientist.

    “The $1.7 billion Rosetta mission will provide a much longer, much closer look at one comet. Instead of taking a brief snapshot, Rosetta will observe as the comet goes from a quiescent ball of ice and rock to an active comet spewing out dust and gas and then make before-and-after comparisons. “We’ll observe how this occurs, how this activity is onset, how it fluctuates, really how a comet works over a long time period,” Dr. Taylor said. “That’s really the difference between this and anything that’s been done before.”

    “Launched in March 2004, it followed a circuitous route through the solar system, using flybys of the Earth and Mars to fling itself into the same orbital path as Comet C-G. In January, it successfully emerged from a hibernation of two and a half years and began its final approach.”

    The first manmade spacecraft to orbit a comet. Congratulations ESA! 

     
  7. 09:47

    notes: 813

    reblogged from: scanzen

    tags: space shuttleChallengerspace exploration

    image: download

    scanzen:

Space Shuttle Challenger on pad.
Someone posted this photo on Facebook long ago. Date, source is unknown for me, Google image search has failed, maybe it was scanned from a book or magazine. Any idea where is this photo from?

    scanzen:

    Space Shuttle Challenger on pad.

    Someone posted this photo on Facebook long ago. Date, source is unknown for me, Google image search has failed, maybe it was scanned from a book or magazine. Any idea where is this photo from?

     
  8. Officials unable to contact animal-carrying spaceship

    spaceexp:

    http://cdn1.img22.ria.ru/images/93841/06/938410652.jpgThe Russian Foton M4 space capsule carrying a package of biological and materials research specimens, including geckos and plant seeds, has stopped responding to commands from Earth, the Russian space agency announced Thursday (July 24). Researchers planned to monitor the effects of microgravity on the adult geckos, including their sexual behavior and embryonic development

    Read More

     
  9. [Nichelle Nichols’] record of accomplishment speaks for itself: NASA originally had 1500 applicants from women and minorities on file. Women in Motion helped spur that number to exceed 8000 in six months. Nichols received the American Society of Aerospace Education’s Friend of the Year award for ‘outstanding contributions to the promotion of aviation and space.
    —  from a November 1985 article in Starlog about Nichelle Nichols’ work with NASA’s Women in Motion program. (via trekkiefeminist)
     
  10. 10:18 21st Jul 2014

    notes: 814

    reblogged from: einbear

    tags: space explorationApollo 111969

    crookedindifference:

    Read the Apollo 11 Flight Plan in Its 353-Page Entirety

    Exactly 45 years ago today, after months of preparation, Apollo 11 embarked on its now-legendary mission to the moon. But what exactly does it take to send three men into the great, vacuous unknown? See for yourself.

    This 353-page document is the entire Apollo 11 flight plan in all its scientific glory. And if it gets a little confusing it’s because this is one of those rare cases where, yes, it actually is rocket science.

    Thankfully, the National Archives does provide a small amount of decoding of the highly technical literature. This acronym key should be of some help:

    • CSM = Command Service Module
    • CMP = Command Module Pilot (Mike Collins)
    • LM = Lunar Module
    • CDR = Commander of the Mission (Neil Armstrong)
    • LMP = Lunar Module Pilot (Buzz Aldrin)
    • MCC-H = Mission Control Center-Houston.
    • LLM = Lunar Landing Mision
    • S/C = Spacecraft

    And as an added bonus, NASA has also kindly made available the entire Apollo 11 onboard voice transcription. Yep—you get to be privy to every last word uttered between our three space heroes as they were making history happen.