1. image: download

     
  2. thejunglenook:


Dr. Peter Venkman: Egon, this reminds me of the time you tried to drill a hole through your head. Remember that? Dr. Egon Spengler: That would have worked if you hadn’t stopped me. 

Harold Ramis(November 21, 1944 – February 24, 2014)

    thejunglenook:

    Dr. Peter Venkman: Egon, this reminds me of the time you tried to drill a hole through your head. Remember that? 
    Dr. Egon Spengler: That would have worked if you hadn’t stopped me. 

    Harold Ramis
    (November 21, 1944 – February 24, 2014)

     
  3. image: download

    explore-blog:

This charming portrait of Charles Darwin and his fox terrier Polly by London-based illustrator Kerry Hyndman is the sweetest thing since this photo of Maurice Sendak and his German shepherd Herman. Pair with literary history’s notable pets and the authors who loved them.

On the Origin of Species was published on November 24 1859

    explore-blog:

    This charming portrait of Charles Darwin and his fox terrier Polly by London-based illustrator Kerry Hyndman is the sweetest thing since this photo of Maurice Sendak and his German shepherd Herman. Pair with literary history’s notable pets and the authors who loved them.

    On the Origin of Species was published on November 24 1859

     
  4. smithsonianlibraries:

Kepler and his biggest fan. 
Portrait of Kepler from The Moon Hoax; or, a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings. By Richard Adams Locke. 1859
(fan actually from this book - artistic license )

    smithsonianlibraries:

    Kepler and his biggest fan. 

    Portrait of Kepler from The Moon Hoax; or, a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings. By Richard Adams Locke. 1859

    (fan actually from this book - artistic license )

     
  5. 7knotwind:

    Newton’s notebook pages

     
  6. 09:20 25th Jul 2013

    notes: 637

    reblogged from: scienceyoucanlove

    tags: scientistbiology

    scienceyoucanlove:

    Happy Birthday to one of my fav scientists!!

    Rosalind Franklin 
    1920 - 1958

    Rosalind Franklin always liked facts. She was logical and precise, and impatient with things that were otherwise. She decided to become a scientist when she was 15. She passed the examination for admission to Cambridge University in 1938, and it sparked a family crisis. Although her family was well-to-do and had a tradition of public service and philanthropy, her father disapproved of university education for women. He refused to pay. An aunt stepped in and said Franklin should go to school, and she would pay for it. Franklin’s mother also took her side until her father finally gave in.

    War broke out in Europe in 1939 and Franklin stayed at Cambridge. She graduated in 1941 and started work on her doctorate. Her work focused on a wartime problem: the nature of coal and charcoal and how to use them most efficiently. She published five papers on the subject before she was 26 years old. Her work is still quoted today, and helped launch the field of high-strength carbon fibers. At 26, Franklin had her PhD and the war was just over. She began working in x-ray diffraction — using x-rays to create images of crystalized solids. She pioneered the use of this method in analyzing complex, unorganized matter such as large biological molecules, and not just single crystals.

    She spent three years in France, enjoying the work atmosphere, the freedoms of peacetime, the French food and culture. But in 1950, she realized that if she wanted to make a scientific career in England, she had to go back. She was invited to King’s College in London to join a team of scientists studying living cells. The leader of the team assigned her to work on DNA with a graduate student. Franklin’s assumption was that it was her own project. The laboratory’s second-in-command, Maurice Wilkins, was on vacation at the time, and when he returned, their relationship was muddled. He assumed she was to assist his work; she assumed she’d be the only one working on DNA. They had powerful personality differences as well: Franklin direct, quick, decisive, and Wilkins shy, speculative, and passive. This would play a role in the coming years as the race unfolded to find the structure of DNA.

    Franklin made marked advances in x-ray diffraction techniques with DNA. She adjusted her equipment to produce an extremely fine beam of x-rays. She extracted finer DNA fibers than ever before and arranged them in parallel bundles. And she studied the fibers’ reactions to humid conditions. All of these allowed her to discover crucial keys to DNA’s structure. Wilkins shared her data, without her knowledge, with James Watson and Francis Crick, at Cambridge University, and they pulled ahead in the race, ultimately publishing the proposed structure of DNA in March, 1953.

    The strained relationship with Wilkins and other aspects of King’s College (the women scientists were not allowed to eat lunch in the common room where the men did, for example) led Franklin to seek another position. She headed her own research group at Birkbeck College in London. But the head of King’s let her go on the condition she would not work on DNA. Franklin returned to her studies of coal and also wrapped up her DNA work. She turned her attention to viruses, publishing 17 papers in five years. Her group’s findings laid the foundation for structural virology.

    While on a professional visit to the United States, Franklin had episodes of pain that she soon learned were ovarian cancer. She continued working over the next two years, through three operations and experimental chemotherapy and a 10-month remission. She worked up until a few weeks before her death in 1958 at age 37.

    source

    photo 2 source

     
  7. I THINK IN PICTURES. Words are like a second language to me. I translate both spoken and written words into full-color movies, complete with sound, which run like a VCR tape in my head. When somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures. Language-based thinkers often find this phenomenon difficult to understand, but in my job as an equipment designer for the livestock industry, visual thinking is a tremendous advantage.
    — 

    Chapter 1: Autism and Visual Thought
    Dr. Temple Grandin

    (via theadoracleopatra)

     
  8. 10:54

    notes: 92

    reblogged from: gofuckamermaid

    tags: 2010scientistbiologyTemple Grandin

    Temple Grandin (2010)

    science&fiction: I have seen recently this HBO tv movie, an adaptation of Temple Grandin autobiography. This is very good. The film tells how she became a scientist and studied animal behavior. Her autism brought her some difficulties, but her different way to see the world also helped her to notice things neglected by other people. The film illustrates in an interesting manner how she thinks. Good performance by Claire Danes. With this film, I learned a lot of things.  Recommended for all. This is also possible to see conferences by Temple Grandin on youtube or read her books. 

     
  9. 09:13 4th Jun 2013

    notes: 79

    reblogged from:

    tags: stampatomscientistphysics

    image: download

    atomic-sauce:

Niels Bohrs

Stamp for the 50 years of the Bohr model, introduced in 1913. 100th anniversary this year.  

    atomic-sauce:

    Niels Bohrs

    Stamp for the 50 years of the Bohr model, introduced in 1913. 100th anniversary this year.  

     
  10. image: download

    fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Arthur Eddington, a British astrophysicist who was able to provide evidence for Einstein’s theory of general relativity, as well as introducing many other revolutionary ideas of German science to an increasingly anti-German British audience during World War I. He also promoted the infinite monkey theorem as a way to consider time span in statistical probabilities.  

He traveled to the island of Principe to photograph the eclipse of May 29, 1919. Positions of star images within the field near the sun were used to verify Albert Einstein’s prediction of the bending of light around the sun from his general theory of relativity.

    fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

    Arthur Eddington, a British astrophysicist who was able to provide evidence for Einstein’s theory of general relativity, as well as introducing many other revolutionary ideas of German science to an increasingly anti-German British audience during World War I. He also promoted the infinite monkey theorem as a way to consider time span in statistical probabilities.  

    He traveled to the island of Principe to photograph the eclipse of May 29, 1919. Positions of star images within the field near the sun were used to verify Albert Einstein’s prediction of the bending of light around the sun from his general theory of relativity.