1. Snake Plissken vs The Postman, who wins ?

    Two characters living in a harsh version of 2013: 

    Snake Plissken: 

    • 5’10”, one eyed, good fighter and shooter
    • profession: former U.S. Army Lieutenant, criminal.
    • Ruthless, cynical, a loner  
    • Good at: piloting, hang gliding, surf and basketball
    • main enemy: politicians who force him to do something.  
    • Movies: Escape from New York (1981)  and  Escape from L.A. (1996, the story takes place in 2013)

    The Postman (movie version)

    • 6’1”, good fighter and shooter
    • Profession: wandering comedian, background: unknown
    • Was a lone wanderer, and not completely honest, but he changes with time.  Brings hope and unity, can raise an army. 
    • Good at: horse riding, reciting Shakespeare, carrying mail   
    • main enemy: neo-fascists
    • His movie: The Postman (1997, the story takes place in 2013)  

    Imagine a fight between them (the way you want).  You can vote for the winner in the answers.  I will count the votes tomorrow (January 11) at 7pm (Eastern time).  

     
  2. Athlete: Snake Plissken

    Disciplines: Basketball, hang gliding, surf, boxing, shooting, wrestling 

    Note: Snake is a great athlete but he lacks motivation.  To encourage him, his coach implanted a bomb on him.  He will explode if he doesn’t win at least two medals.  

     
  3.  
  4. kikoartoiscunningham:

    Three badasses. One badass movie. Will always be one of my badass favorites.

     
  5. plays: 305

    "Call me Snake"

    Some audio clips from Escape from New York and Escape from L.A.

     
  6. image: download

     
  7. sinkingfast:


One of my favorite movies.

    sinkingfast:

    One of my favorite movies.

     
  8.  
  9. image: download

    "Moving from the smoke-blued background, McReady was a figure from some forgotten myth, a looming, bronze statue that held life, and walked. Six-feet-four inches he stood as he halted beside the table, and, with a characteristic glance upward to assure himself of room under the lower ceiling beam, straightened. His rough, clashingly orange windproof jacket he still had on, yet on his huge frame it did not seem misplaced. Even here, four feet beneath the drift-wind that droned across the Antarctic waste above the ceiling, the cold of the frozen continent leaked in, and gave meaning to the harshness of the man. And he was bronze – his great red-bronze beard, the heavy hair that matched it. The gnarled, corded hands gripping, relaxing, gripping relaxing on the table planks were bronze. Even the deep-sunken eyes beneath heavy brows were bronzed."
John W. Campbell, Who Goes There?,  1938 

    "Moving from the smoke-blued background, McReady was a figure from some forgotten myth, a looming, bronze statue that held life, and walked. Six-feet-four inches he stood as he halted beside the table, and, with a characteristic glance upward to assure himself of room under the lower ceiling beam, straightened. His rough, clashingly orange windproof jacket he still had on, yet on his huge frame it did not seem misplaced. Even here, four feet beneath the drift-wind that droned across the Antarctic waste above the ceiling, the cold of the frozen continent leaked in, and gave meaning to the harshness of the man. And he was bronze – his great red-bronze beard, the heavy hair that matched it. The gnarled, corded hands gripping, relaxing, gripping relaxing on the table planks were bronze. Even the deep-sunken eyes beneath heavy brows were bronzed."

    John W. Campbell, Who Goes There?,  1938 

     
  10. image: download

    The block of ice in the Norwegian Camp in The Thing (1982)

    The block of ice in the Norwegian Camp in The Thing (1982)